View Poll Results: How many hours a week do you work?

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  • Less than 20

    4 6.90%
  • 20 - 30

    1 1.72%
  • 30 - 40

    24 41.38%
  • 40 - 50

    20 34.48%
  • 50 - 60

    4 6.90%
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Thread: How many hours a week do you work

  1. #1
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    How many hours a week do you work

    How many hours a week do you work?
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  2. #2
    Voted.
    Why do you ask, Alex?

  3. #3
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    Just a regular 8-4pm day for me.

    I work longer hours when necessary, I'm out of the house at 5am tomorrow morning to travel to Stevenage for the day. But that's not common, I'm usually a desk dweller.

    I do spend a decent amount of time "working" on my own projects at home, but that doesn't really count as work.

  4. #4
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    No paid work but when doing the house...about 70 hours a week. Averaged over a year...maybe 30 hrs a week???
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  5. #5
    Regular simonsaunders's Avatar
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    40-50, exc. travel. Closer to 40. I work very densely though. Maximum reward for the time I put in. No point in cruising, but doing 12 hour days.

    I work very flexibly and most weeks I have no commute as I work from home. When I do commute it normally involves an A380.
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  6. #6
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    In hotel days 100hrs + in the summer and 30hrs in the winter
    Previous job 80hrs a week including travel
    Current job 37.5hrs a week and forty days holiday a year.... itís why I took it! Feels like semi-retirement after the previous twenty years
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  7. #7
    37.5 hours under PAYE

    Varies under self employment, so put 40-50 as that's probably the average.
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  8. #8
    Regular Dave G's Avatar
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    37 contracted and paid.

    More like 50-60 including travel and Ďovertimeí (unpaid but for da love)

  9. #9
    37 hours, give or take 5 minutes.
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  10. #10
    Contracted hours are 36 a week, but when I travel I end up doing more than that which can easily be over 40.

    To be fair work do encourage us to take back the TOIL for when we have worked significantly more than our contracted hours.

  11. #11
    Regular Darren Langeveld's Avatar
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    Define work?

  12. #12
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    Too many, used to think this was a badge of honour. Itís not! I need to learn to delegate more, procrastinate less, and improve my efficiency to reduce the hours and maintain my output.
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  13. #13
    Regular Chris D's Avatar
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    Paid 24/7 at the moment. When not deployed I probably do 30

    New job is contracted and paid for 37.5. Business travel included.
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  14. #14
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    Basic 37 hours
    10 mins each way walking

    Am lucky - the girlfriend drives 40 mins each way (over an hour in the summer due to traffic)

  15. #15
    A little seasonal, and depends on demand, but around 5 hours a week at the moment (mostly bloody emails!).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    Voted.
    Why do you ask, Alex?
    Just curious.
    I know I work too many hours at the moment (60+ pretty much every week), but I have a light at the end of the tunnel.
    I did 12 hours yesterday alone, which got me wondering who else does the same.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Langeveld View Post
    Define work?
    You don't work, you just play with cars all day.

    Oh, wait.....
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  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by sparrow View Post
    Just curious.
    I know I work too many hours at the moment (60+ pretty much every week), but I have a light at the end of the tunnel.
    I did 12 hours yesterday alone, which got me wondering who else does the same.


    Same here, a few years ago 80-100 hour weeks, eased off since we went full-time at motorhomes, then after my dad had a heart attack, I said Fcuk this for a caper and scaled back more, including not working every Saturday.
    And I find I'm no worse off, and have just as many customers.

  19. #19
    Regular Darren Langeveld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparrow View Post
    You don't work, you just play with cars all day.

    Oh, wait.....

  20. #20
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    As close to 40 as humanly possible, but my workplace is operational for ~90 hours a week and Iím management so I inevitably work a little outside scheduled hours.
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  21. #21
    Regular Neil Mac's Avatar
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    Regular 39 hours, plus paid overtime.

    I've never been as enthusiastic about overtime as some of my colleagues, but now I'm averaging an extra 3-4 hours a week. Not ridiculous, in other words.

    On business trips to Japan? Very silly long hours, plus travel to/from hotel and eating out at a time when I'm normally considering being in bed. Fortunately, those trips are rare.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brando View Post
    Too many, used to think this was a badge of honour. Itís not! I need to learn to delegate more, procrastinate less, and improve my efficiency to reduce the hours and maintain my output.
    If you take nothing else from agile practice, avoiding context switching is the key.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevem View Post
    If you take nothing else from agile practice, avoiding context switching is the key.
    Yes, factoring that into how I structure my day a lot at the moment.
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  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Langeveld View Post
    Define work?
    It's anything that is earning money to me. In whatever form, legal or perhaps not
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  25. #25
    Regular Floyd's Avatar
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    No.2 in the list

    There are a few of these surveys that ask the dying what their thoughts are and most have 'I wished I hadn't worked so hard/long/for someone else'.
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  26. #26
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    Work, or 'work'?

    I mean, does the bike ride I just did for lunch count? How about the swimming lesson I'm about to take my daughter to?



    Mine varies massively TBH. Some days and weeks loads, others much less. I work from home most days though, tend to have to go to London once a week, occasionally go to Southampton too.

    Work life balance is so important. Having done years and years of a 3.5hr+ commute into central London everyday and 50hrs minimum in the office and my mental health suffering I wouldn't do it again lightly and certainly not for an extended period.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Langeveld View Post
    Define work?
    I donít meet any requirements of Ďworkí & my default position is Ďretiredí. Just feels like a long summer holiday.
    I do have responsibilities though & Iím just sorting a lot atm.
    Whatís nice though is Iím sitting in a cafe with two friends having lunch which was completely unplanned.
    Work-itís overrated.

  28. #28
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    I've worked 12 hour day / night shifts for the last 25 years. Average 36 hours a week, but some weeks the pattern is 60 hours, others none to get the average over the year. 5 week repeating pattern, I can tell exactly what I'm working from now until the day I retire which is why I usually plan so far ahead.

    Getting time off at short notice is almost impossible.

    There are 5 of us in my team, 1 of us at work at all times which puts a lot of pressure on us from a cover point of view when anyone is off on holiday or sick. Fortunately we have a great team and we don't take time off unless we're genuinely poorly.

    When I'm having to cover it can mean that I have to work every day of the week but that's usually for a week or two while covering holidays.

    Working shifts suits my lifestyle, but I'll probably only be doing them another 4 years.

    My commute is 10 minutes each way which is about as much as I want

  29. #29
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    I used to work late every night a few years ago. Perhaps not so much chasing the money as loving the job! The problem with my work is it seems the more you do the more there is. In the last few years I have pruned it back a bit. I try to shut the doors at 5pm and get home to have some time with the kids. I think I succumbed to the old adage "don't work harder, work smarter". The way the business is currently running is brilliant. The balance of profitability to hours worked has never been better.
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  30. #30
    Tough to say exactly the hrs, varies a lot, this wk for example the 60hr+ a wk box was ticked by Tuesday!

    And as most self employed folks will tell you it's not the thing you do as the job that makes the hrs so long, it's the paperwork & quotes etc etc you do after the 'job' & when you've already done a say 15 hr day & still got stuff to do when back home that's when it hurts, or your day off is spent on paperwork or I have to sort stuff out I've broken on a vehicle or trailer etc, that's the dis-heartening bit.

    I'll do some long wks but not continuously, this wk was a bit of a slog for example, but a good one dosh wise, next wk will be far more restrained, rare for me to do 2 mega slog wks back to back, does happen on occasion but not a 3rd wk, can't anymore rack up the continual mega hrs, have had to at times but it's not good for the mind, body or soul & frankly I'm too old for that shizzle now anyway! But the sub 40 hr wks are a daydream really unless I'm in an odd quiet week, which frankly I relish! but just never know when that will be.

    However I do try & get a reasonable work life balance, I really try not to work wk ends unless it's just unavoidable but I usually program in a wk day & ideally 2 as the wk end as a compensation & the mega long wks are the exception rather than the rule.
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  31. #31
    Regular Uncle Benz's Avatar
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    The saving grace of self-employment is the ability to control it. Fair enough, if you don't work you don't get paid, but the control, for me, is worth it.

    Don't get me started about MTD though!!
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  32. #32
    Lots, with the idea I put the hours in now so I donít have to worry about earning a lot after ~40

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbit View Post
    Lots, with the idea I put the hours in now so I donít have to worry about earning a lot after ~40
    Good plan mate. The body starts to complain past that milestone anyway...
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  34. #34
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    Contracted 35 hrs and try to stick to it.

    I'm out of the house probably 48 hrs a week including commuting, but that includes taking an hour for lunch most days at the gym too which is a good balance.

    Previous job was contracted 35 hrs, but longer commute, on call 24/7 every other week, lots of out of hours and weekend working etc. which got tiresome.
    Too many cars...

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbit View Post
    Lots, with the idea I put the hours in now so I donít have to worry about earning a lot after ~40
    This was my plan, head down and charge to 40 (3 years to go) then review! Saving and investing as much as possible. However, 2018 wasn't so obliging. 3 more years like 2015, 2016, and 2017, and it would have been an 'easy' win. 2018 taught me to take nothing for granted and that, while saving and investing is great, it's important to live a little.
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  36. #36
    As little as possible.

    I am contracted to work 40 but after many years of killing myself and my home life with 60+ for naff all reward, The company gets what they pay for.

    I'll happily do more for customers or specific projects but gone are the days when i'll bend over backwards and kill myself for work. Lap top off at 5, Gym at lunchtimes when I work from home and meetings arranged at times that mean I don't have to wake up at 5am and schlep through rush hour traffic. I never travel Fridays.

    Too many people have the balance wrong, great saving for retirement etc but what's that worth if you have zero life in your prime years.
    Last edited by Weeman; 01-04-2019 at 11:33 AM.
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  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Weeman View Post
    Too many people have the balance wrong, great saving for retirement etc but what's that worth if you have zero life in your prime years.
    So true but let's forget retirement... I think the issue is being able to have a 'life' without the funds in your prime years

    If you don't kill yourself to get ahead, you don't have the rewards to enjoy life now. If you do kill yourself to get ahead, you don't have the time to enjoy life now... and sod's law, will get some horrific diagnosis on your 40th birthday that makes you think none of it was worth it

    I consider myself very lucky because although financially i'm a slave to the boring stuff - mortgage etc, at least I have a house, can afford a few 'ring trips a year, and don't have to worry about the cost of doing day to day stuff

    Those that are a slave to rent have a struggle to amass the funds for deposits so at least they're paying towards an asset, and even less security around pensions

    Everything else equal, if I'd been born 10 years earlier, i'd have "completed life" at 35. Would still need to work, but it would be working to live. Mortgage paid, decent house, happy days.

    10 years later and I'd be slaving away, smaller house, less savings, and have a longer 'work sentence'... easily working until retirement age and no doubt beyond.

    I am envious of the mental strength / mindset of anyone having kids right now that isn't stressed to feck about what the challenges of bringing up a person for the next 20 years

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbit View Post
    Everything else equal, if I'd been born 10 years earlier, i'd have "completed life" at 35. Would still need to work, but it would be working to live. Mortgage paid, decent house, happy days.

    10 years later and I'd be slaving away, smaller house, less savings, and have a longer 'work sentence'... easily working until retirement age and no doubt beyond.

    I am envious of the mental strength / mindset of anyone having kids right now that isn't stressed to feck about what the challenges of bringing up a person for the next 20 years

    Same for me! And what will the next 10 years after that be. This, more than anything else (Brexit included), makes me think a big change is imminent.
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  39. #39
    Regular Floyd's Avatar
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    I had no planning in my 20s and 30s. I was in debt, mortgage, bills, credit cards and a child. First wife didn't work very much either. I did 7 days a week for a year at one point and gained feck all apart from amassing slightly less debt. The only thing I got right was paying into my pension.
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  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by hobbit View Post
    So true but let's forget retirement... I think the issue is being able to have a 'life' without the funds in your prime years

    If you don't kill yourself to get ahead, you don't have the rewards to enjoy life now. If you do kill yourself to get ahead, you don't have the time to enjoy life now... and sod's law, will get some horrific diagnosis on your 40th birthday that makes you think none of it was worth it

    I consider myself very lucky because although financially i'm a slave to the boring stuff - mortgage etc, at least I have a house, can afford a few 'ring trips a year, and don't have to worry about the cost of doing day to day stuff

    Those that are a slave to rent have a struggle to amass the funds for deposits so at least they're paying towards an asset, and even less security around pensions

    Everything else equal, if I'd been born 10 years earlier, i'd have "completed life" at 35. Would still need to work, but it would be working to live. Mortgage paid, decent house, happy days.

    10 years later and I'd be slaving away, smaller house, less savings, and have a longer 'work sentence'... easily working until retirement age and no doubt beyond.

    I am envious of the mental strength / mindset of anyone having kids right now that isn't stressed to feck about what the challenges of bringing up a person for the next 20 years
    I've made all the standard mistakes about borrowing and upto now ( 42) have very little to show. My mortgage on the house I had in Holland was the best part of half my salary hahahaha.

    What I did and that I think more people should do is just shoot under your means. I was offered £250k as a mortgage many years ago back here in the UK. I bought a fairly simple house that does the trick and was just about large enough for the family for £125. I have nor ever had any intentions to move from it. I watch friends constantly moving to the next new house as its apparently that bit bigger for their 1-2 kids and a cat They end up mortgaged up the wazzoo and never do anything remotely nice apart from occasionally borrowing a shit load more money to go on some vile all inclusive to Turkey or they get a f**king caravan.

    I had that shitty Golf for 9 years until I'd saved enough to get what I'd say was a dream car. It was paid for in cash after saving. My bathroom looks like a time warp to the early 80's it even has a shell shaped sink. My mum keeps pestering " you had your bathroom done yet?? " " NO! " I can shower in it, shit in it, It serves its function. Yes i'd like a nice one but am I borrowing £5k to do it, am I ****.

    As a result , I have enough money to go do nice things, go on nice, none package holidays, Give my son the things he wants and take him on adventures and pay for dinner on Tinder dates like a proper gentleman I do over pay into my pension ( I hate the mere word pension and all they represent) but I'm also perfectly resigned to working in some form or other long into my 70's. The thought of just stopping and spending my time mincing around for the sake of mincing around fills me with dread.

    " oh but what if you want a nice car when you retire"

    By the time I retire I will have spent 40 years doing 20-30,000 miles per year. I cant wait to retire and stop ****ing driving completely!!!!. Last thing i'll want to do
    Last edited by Weeman; 02-04-2019 at 09:43 AM.
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  41. #41
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    Except, you don't particularly like living where you are..

    So yes, kudos you're financially comfortable as a result, but to some living in a nicer area and forgoing fancy non package holiday's is key to a happy life?

    Most of us spend ~ 50 weeks a year in our home, and ~ 2 weeks on holiday. Some might argue, your balance is wrong if your priority is on having a fabulous 2 weeks a year, whilst spending the rest of it wishing you were somewhere else.

  42. #42
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    I think I'm incredibly lucky to be in a forever house if I wanted it to be. When it's finished (a while yet...), I could down size and be mortgage free, but for now I'll carry on paying it off. I still get nice holidays. My work life balance isn't as good as I want it to be. I really just want to work for 3/4 days a week in a job of my choosing. I'd quite happily retire today if I could - I've got loads to do and there's so many activities I could get involved in once I'm done.
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  43. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim View Post
    Except, you don't particularly like living where you are..

    So yes, kudos you're financially comfortable as a result, but to some living in a nicer area and forgoing fancy non package holiday's is key to a happy life?

    Most of us spend ~ 50 weeks a year in our home, and ~ 2 weeks on holiday. Some might argue, your balance is wrong if your priority is on having a fabulous 2 weeks a year, whilst spending the rest of it wishing you were somewhere else.
    I am happy in my home, and its in a nice street. The fact I am massively annoyed by the amount of mouth breathers that live in Chesterfield isn't relevant. I'd love to live somewhere else and I have a dream home, fact is the stress of paying for that and not having as much disposable income would make me unhappier than actually living in it, if that makes sense. if I was splitting the costs with another adult i'm sure I might be somewhere a little nicer, making that move as a single person paying every single bill and £400 maintenance aint happening haha
    Ermmmmm

  44. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Weeman View Post
    I am happy in my home, and its in a nice street. The fact I am massively annoyed by the amount of mouth breathers that live in Chesterfield isn't relevant. I'd love to live somewhere else and I have a dream home, fact is the stress of paying for that and not having as much disposable income would make me unhappier than actually living in it, if that makes sense.
    Bingo. We moved because we decided that the stuff that annoyed us was sufficient to make it worthwhile

    Let's be honest, it's all first world problems but that's what life is...

    From new build estate with no mortgage, but 'issues' (parking = non existent so cars everywhere, car space in front of garage so would swap cars every morning/evening, not all neighbours were particularly great on the estate, overlooked gardens, felt like we were in cages etc) to 'the worst house on the best street we could afford'. We are the only house that shares a driveway, a couple of new builds on land that the school behind us sold. Detached, with double garage and non-overlooked garden. Being next to the school means totally quiet evenings and weekends, and noise at playtimes if we were home during the day with the windows open

    The 'in-between' house was still an estate, but had an integral garage and smaller rooms / bathroom / en-suite (we were in a town house, so they built up not out - which is good for internal space, so our initial house spoiled us)

    We went from no mortgage and the ability to have a nice car / stuff ... and nowhere to put it ... to a huge mortgage and no funds to enjoy the nice car We're working on the basis of 'one day' it'll be worth it, when the mortgage is lower...


    I think it's about lifestyle, as someone's said above. If you like your holidays and weekend breaks and don't care about "stuff" at home then our first place would have been perfect

    But if you are more of a nest-maker and like spending time at home to relax, then we wouldn't ever have been properly settled.

    As i said though, all first world problems... we're all incredibly lucky

  45. #45
    Regular Marty's Avatar
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    In my 20s, I worked for a company that worked with a couple of big US companies, and I alternated between the UK and the US a lot. When I was in the UK, I worked a 40-hour week. When I was onsite in the US, I worked around 100 hours a week. On one occasion on the CES trade show in Vegas, I worked 80 hours more or less without stopping. I think I slept for 15 minutes in the server room twice. I lost 20kg and came home utterly miserable.

    Shortly afterwards, I started working for an agency in London - office-based, no travel. However, inevitably as a junior developer I would end up pulling all-nighters and long weekends as deadlines approached and worthless project managers demanded more (unpaid) time out of me "to get the site live".

    As I gained more experience and moved up to senior level, I learned to push back on those sorts of requests for my own health and sanity. There were still crunch periods around deadlines/launch dates, but less unpleasant than previously.

    I went contracting around 8 years ago as a way of getting paid more to raise a deposit for a house, and very quickly found the perfect way to prevent worthless project managers from demanding long hours: my contract. Every contract I signed had a fixed number of hours that I could bill for per week, with extra hours usually only permitted by negotiation. I used to get a huge kick out of telling my PM that my out-of-hours rate was 3x my standard day rate. Suddenly, the 'extremely urgent' work that 'absolutely must get done this weekend' would somehow become less urgent. Even better, one memorable contract expressly forbid me from working any hours beyond my standard 40 per week, a paragraph I actually highlighted and showed to the head of HR after one request to work late nights for launch week.

    After 8 years of contracting, last year I was made an offer I couldn't refuse to go back to permanent employment. I tend to stick to my 40 contracted hours per week now. It'll spike sometimes, usually around the time of a big release into production, but I'm in control of how many hours I work because I'm usually the one planning the deployments. I get all of the extra hours back as time in lieu, which has been a handy way of bolstering my holiday allowance.

    One thing I will say is that having a family totally changed my outlook on working late nights and weekends. Missing out on bedtimes or weekends because of work suddenly switched from being 'unpleasant but worth it for the extra time/money' to 'not worth it'.

    I realise I'm very fortunate to be in the position I'm in and I'm grateful every day, but I don't think I'd be in this position without those unpleasant experiences of 100-hour weeks back in my 20s.

  46. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Marty View Post
    In my 20s, I worked for a company that worked with a couple of big US companies, and I alternated between the UK and the US a lot. When I was in the UK, I worked a 40-hour week. When I was onsite in the US, I worked around 100 hours a week. On one occasion on the CES trade show in Vegas, I worked 80 hours more or less without stopping. I think I slept for 15 minutes in the server room twice. I lost 20kg and came home utterly miserable.

    Shortly afterwards, I started working for an agency in London - office-based, no travel. However, inevitably as a junior developer I would end up pulling all-nighters and long weekends as deadlines approached and worthless project managers demanded more (unpaid) time out of me "to get the site live".

    As I gained more experience and moved up to senior level, I learned to push back on those sorts of requests for my own health and sanity. There were still crunch periods around deadlines/launch dates, but less unpleasant than previously.

    I went contracting around 8 years ago as a way of getting paid more to raise a deposit for a house, and very quickly found the perfect way to prevent worthless project managers from demanding long hours: my contract. Every contract I signed had a fixed number of hours that I could bill for per week, with extra hours usually only permitted by negotiation. I used to get a huge kick out of telling my PM that my out-of-hours rate was 3x my standard day rate. Suddenly, the 'extremely urgent' work that 'absolutely must get done this weekend' would somehow become less urgent. Even better, one memorable contract expressly forbid me from working any hours beyond my standard 40 per week, a paragraph I actually highlighted and showed to the head of HR after one request to work late nights for launch week.

    After 8 years of contracting, last year I was made an offer I couldn't refuse to go back to permanent employment. I tend to stick to my 40 contracted hours per week now. It'll spike sometimes, usually around the time of a big release into production, but I'm in control of how many hours I work because I'm usually the one planning the deployments. I get all of the extra hours back as time in lieu, which has been a handy way of bolstering my holiday allowance.

    One thing I will say is that having a family totally changed my outlook on working late nights and weekends. Missing out on bedtimes or weekends because of work suddenly switched from being 'unpleasant but worth it for the extra time/money' to 'not worth it'.

    I realise I'm very fortunate to be in the position I'm in and I'm grateful every day, but I don't think I'd be in this position without those unpleasant experiences of 100-hour weeks back in my 20s.

    Very well said. I did some monster hours when I worked in Holland , I was at a customers in Germany daily for 6 months , with an hour and a half commute there and back. I was there so often and pulled so many late nights I even did Ramadan with the Turkish workers to fit in My relationship ending was actually a really good thing, if it hadn't I'd have probably carried on the same working schedule and pressures and missed almost all of my boys growing up.
    Ermmmmm

  47. #47
    Around 65 Hours/week

    I work ~10 hrs/day Monday to Saturday (7-5) and 6ish hours on a Sunday (8-2)

    I do that for 8 weeks, then I fly back to the UK and have 2 weeks off where I try and spend 8 weeks of wages.

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