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Thread: BMW GS. Talk to me!

  1. #1
    Regular findlay's Avatar
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    BMW GS. Talk to me!

    Why are they so ruddy expensive? They have half the number of wheels as a proper vehicle!

    Anyway. Starting to like bikes. Not crotch rockets, but sit up, comfy looking things. GS, Africa Twin etc. Maybe there are more options. Triumph? Takasuki? Seyafeelie? Jap Stuff?

    So something comfortable for poor roads. Iím 5í7Ē and 11stone so nothing that I couldnít manage to move myself.

    What options would there be? Other than exposing myself to unnecessary risk (and needing a bike test) plus needing to develop a leather fetish, what does a bike novice need to know as part of the contemplation of a stupid idea?
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    Regular simonsaunders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by findlay View Post
    Why are they so ruddy expensive? They have half the number of wheels as a proper vehicle!

    Anyway. Starting to like bikes. Not crotch rockets, but sit up, comfy looking things. GS, Africa Twin etc. Maybe there are more options. Triumph? Takasuki? Seyafeelie? Jap Stuff?

    So something comfortable for poor roads. Iím 5í7Ē and 11stone so nothing that I couldnít manage to move myself.

    What options would there be? Other than exposing myself to unnecessary risk (and needing a bike test) plus needing to develop a leather fetish, what does a bike novice need to know as part of the contemplation of a stupid idea?
    The 1150cc and upwards GS have a certain charm, but they are bloody big, heavy bikes though. I find them a little intimidating tbh and Iím 4 inches taller and a fair bit broader (and fatter) than you. The advice that I was given was that in your first year of riding, there is enough going on that you just want an unobtrusive machine. Furthermore, youíre bound to have a mishap - even if it is only dropping the thing - so choose cheap and easy rather than the dream ride. How boring and sensible.

    You can also get bikes with ABS, traction control, etc. Great learner aids!

    Anything around 600cc, Japanese that isnít a sportsbike would be a great start. There will be some model by model specifics, but generally you just make sure that they have oil and fuel in them and they just go. Kawasakis and Suzukis are normally cheapest, but with cheaper fittings that go furry, quicker. Honda and Yamaha are a bit more expensive, stay nice longer, but seem to produce bikes with a little less character? Very sweeping statement.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by simonsaunders View Post
    The 1150cc and upwards GS have a certain charm, but they are bloody big, heavy bikes though. I find them a little intimidating tbh and Iím 4 inches taller and a fair bit broader (and fatter) than you. The advice that I was given was that in your first year of riding, there is enough going on that you just want an unobtrusive machine. Furthermore, youíre bound to have a mishap - even if it is only dropping the thing - so choose cheap and easy rather than the dream ride. How boring and sensible.

    You can also get bikes with ABS, traction control, etc. Great learner aids!

    Anything around 600cc, Japanese that isnít a sportsbike would be a great start. There will be some model by model specifics, but generally you just make sure that they have oil and fuel in them and they just go. Kawasakis and Suzukis are normally cheapest, but with cheaper fittings that go furry, quicker. Honda and Yamaha are a bit more expensive, stay nice longer, but seem to produce bikes with a little less character? Very sweeping statement.
    Great advice, also don't be put off by only a 600, it will still be faster than any car...
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    Stepping away from a 600cc I4 Japanese bike, there are options from Europe and beyond that have an parallel or V twins... slightly more CC than the 600cc I4, probably more torque, but not much difference in outright power.

    The BMW 800s might be worth a look for you - they even do a baby GS.

    Bike shops are really friendly, they love new people coming in to the fold. So should be happy to walk in to a dealer, mention that you’re a newbie and climb all over their stock. Make some brum brum noises if it helps. See what you like.

    Kit is expensive when you are starting, but the big, wintertime bike shows are great for getting massive discount on last season’s kit. The all-weather cordura stuff is most sensible, but a bit old man. The sensible choice is thermal jacket and trousers, but make sure that the thermal lining is removable. Lots of ventilation zips is good. I like summer style raceboots, but that are also waterproof (the race style stuff is comfy enough and gives great feel). Get some decent leather gloves and also some lightweight waterproof ones. Decent helmet and back protector. Make sure it all fits nicely. Even at discount winter bike show prices, that is £500 right there. Could be more like £1,000 if you went nuts at a main dealer. I completely ignored my own advice, but I knew that I wouldn’t be riding in the rain or cold and have non-waterproof race boots, Kevlar lined denim jeans, a leather jacket and a single pair of summer gloves. Safe, but warm summer riding gear only.

    Buy some bike mags, something like Ride is a good bet for kit reviews and sensible riding advice. After 3 months of those, you’ll be way more familiar with the market.

    Talk to your local riding school(s) about what they have to offer. See which one you like.

    Someone will be along soon to contradict all that I say, but bikes are no different to cars on that front...

    I’m completely confused by the new licensing system too. Someone can explain that. Personally, I’d **** the expense and just get yourself through the toughest test for the fullest licence first. I did that back in the day, but things were simpler then.
    Last edited by simonsaunders; 21-08-2018 at 06:42 AM.

  5. #5
    I also would not think you must have a fetish for leathers. Good quality textiles can be more comfortable in hot and cold. I use Rukka and they are great!
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    Regular simonsaunders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjturner View Post
    Great advice, also don't be put off by only a 600, it will still be faster than any car...
    The performance part is very true. 90bhp, 300kg with rider, 300bhp per ton. That is fast by any standard. Despite being the bottom of the rung in terms of ‘proper’ bikes. 0-60 in under 4, a hundred in not much more, 140mph. From a little’un.

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    Regular stevem's Avatar
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    Get an organ donor card sorted before you climb onboard.


    Thatís all I have to add. There are enough shitty drivers on our roads that the risk/reward doesnít work for me.
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    Yesterday I rode from London to Donington and back on my 1992 Yamaha Super Tenere.

    Itís a 70bhp, in line twin Paris-Dakar rep, so pretty slow.

    Riding through London at 4:45am was joy.

    Riding home in horrendous traffic was also a joy.

    Both legs of the journey were a real pleasure. The warm air, the smell of the harvest, slowly filtering through traffic, the camaraderie of the other bikers and not being a Rice Rocket meant I wasnít crippled by back pain.

    And it did nearly 60mpg.

    If I were you Iíd be looking at the GS800 or Triumph 800. Both epic for the man of shorter leg!

    Riding undoubtedly heightens your road skills- everybody wants to kill you, just remember that and youíll be fine!

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    Regular findlay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevem View Post
    There are enough shitty drivers on our roads that the risk/reward doesnít work for me.
    This is my big concern. If an Elise/7/Westfield was in budget, for example, I'd be safe in the knowledge there was some metal around me in he event of the unforeseen. But then I'd need to find somewhere to store it (and eventually the TC, too). I could get a bike in the garage and then I'd have something to use by myself, much like I'd end up doing in the 2-seater.



    Car would still be the preference. Sporty 4 seat cab. But then it's a storage issue again, finding something that would be enjoyable to drive by myself as it would be with the family in tow - so that's into E90 era 330, 335 and again goes out of budget.



    The bike is an interesting concept in my head. Could commute on it over the summer and stick it in the garage over winter. Less to buy, probably less to run and maintain, and bar the romper suit and lid, something that shouldn't be too difficult to get into. The big hurdle, like I said, is the life & limb risk. Not quite sure I can get with that.
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  10. #10
    Regular Neil Mac's Avatar
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    My colleague Bob was given a 2003 GS for free by a mate of his. It needed a few bits and pieces, so Bob spent £300 on it and it's now his occasional toy. Not expensive at all, but this is an exceptional case.

    I had a scary slidey moment on my way home last night due to some slippery substance on the road surface. had I been on a bike I would probably have bounced along the road on my head, and then have had the bike land on me/squash me against a car. And that's before taking the foolishness/carelessness of other road users into account. It's not for me.
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  11. #11
    Regular simonsaunders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by findlay View Post
    This is my big concern. If an Elise/7/Westfield was in budget, for example, I'd be safe in the knowledge there was some metal around me in he event of the unforeseen. But then I'd need to find somewhere to store it (and eventually the TC, too). I could get a bike in the garage and then I'd have something to use by myself, much like I'd end up doing in the 2-seater.



    Car would still be the preference. Sporty 4 seat cab. But then it's a storage issue again, finding something that would be enjoyable to drive by myself as it would be with the family in tow - so that's into E90 era 330, 335 and again goes out of budget.



    The bike is an interesting concept in my head. Could commute on it over the summer and stick it in the garage over winter. Less to buy, probably less to run and maintain, and bar the romper suit and lid, something that shouldn't be too difficult to get into. The big hurdle, like I said, is the life & limb risk. Not quite sure I can get with that.
    It is a big leap. Getting back on a bike after a lay off of many years was a big step for me.

    Around town, I would argue that it is safer than a pushbike. Similar speeds, greater road presence, all that protective gear, etc.

    On the roads, for me it is all about avoiding spaces that cars might be and if you come in a bit too hot, just to try to consciously do all the right things.

    Most people get into bother because they make bad choices around cars, trying to make too much progress, donít read the roads well and respond badly to what unfolds and *very* occasionally just get ****ed by a diesel spill.

    But 99.9% of it is all in your hands, down to your choices. Best bit of advice I got - on a speed awareness course - was that an accident might not technically be your fault, but there are a million things that you could have done to not have it... really reasonated that. Yeah, that car did pull out on me, but did I see it properly, was I looking at what his options were, has he seen me, have I positioned myself to take evasive action, did I roll off and think about braking and a preemptive touch, should I just let him out? There is a lot you could be doing.

    It is ****ing great though.

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    Regular Neil Mac's Avatar
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    Another friend from work no longer rides, as he has twice had cars pull out in front of him while he was travelling at 40mph in a 40mph limit. Large and useful parts of his body were broken both times. Not sure he could have avoided it, as he didn't even have time to swear (just squeak). Sure, he could have been weaving along the road, flashing his headlight and sounding his horn, but who wants to do that all the time? His 4 daughters really need a functioning father, so he chose to retire from active riding.
    "Fortunately, I'd taken a spare Gearbox, Turbo, Actuator, Banjo Connector, Steering Rack, Driveshafts, ECU, Wideband sensor, 57-51mm silicone reducing elbow and a Copper Banjo Washer." - Nige

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Mac View Post
    Another friend from work no longer rides, as he has twice had cars pull out in front of him while he was travelling at 40mph in a 40mph limit. Large and useful parts of his body were broken both times. Not sure he could have avoided it, as he didn't even have time to swear (just squeak). Sure, he could have been weaving along the road, flashing his headlight and sounding his horn, but who wants to do that all the time? His 4 daughters really need a functioning father, so he chose to retire from active riding.
    That is a ****er.

    Two factors in my Ďcome backí were (a) the great healthcare / medical leave package that I get from work and (b) a decision to not commute. Commuting not only spoils the fun, but it is busy roads, busy time of day, youíre in a rush, everyone else is in a rush, there is loads going on, just best avoided. I ride when I want, just for pleasure and that includes keeping it super sensible so that I get home to my 3 year old.

    For all the downsides - and I think that non-bikers see it as more dangerous than it can be made to be through sensible riding - it is a brilliant hobby and there are plenty more dangerous things that you could be doing with your time...

  14. #14
    I like your thinking Findlay.
    This is an itch that I really want to scratch at some point...
    though I'll most likely plump for a sports-bike as opposed to an up-right cruiser
    (I realise that's probably not a popular choice, but so be it..).

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    The biggest + in your favour Findlay & possibly being overlooked is where you stay or what is on your door step.
    That is ultimate biking territory. With all due respect & I can comment on it as I'm currently just outside London & the traffic is mental.

    I get the whole 'biker' thing but if that is riding like as ass then count me out, by this I mean taking chances. For ex they say to filter in traffic you should only be +10mph or tip toe round roundabouts.

    One of my abiding memories & touched on by Oakie is smell. When I passed my cbt the first time my ride home through Glasgow it was the smells that surprised me. Chip shops, Buckfast etc. It was December & I remember kick starting it & immediately reaching for the heater (not there) lol.

    I've noted a few friends doing the whole bike club & run out events to take a picture at a pub & it seems all very social.

    Not sure about the bigger bikes even the Gs's as a learner/freshly passed but definitely being high up gives you a better awareness of events.

    I do know a group of loose chums who have chopped in their sports bikes for Gs's & they go to Eastern Europe on them & were praising the new found comfort.

    The motorcycle fatals I was involved in were the bread n butter crossing the carriageway on left hand turn & overtaking vehicles when the one at the front is turning into a layby.
    Stick to the speed limits (ish), ride safely & with good anticipation then you are in the best place to enjoy it with all that on your doorstep.

    Only edit I'll add is that coming from/ competing on 'scramblers' is that I can't ride without anything less than full motocross boots. I did look silly when I had my Hornet but I like my ankles/shins protected.

    Also book onto an off road / enduro skill day- invaluable experience that'll make all the difference.
    Last edited by Fitz711; 21-08-2018 at 03:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Mac View Post
    Another friend from work no longer rides, as he has twice had cars pull out in front of him while he was travelling at 40mph in a 40mph limit. Large and useful parts of his body were broken both times. Not sure he could have avoided it, as he didn't even have time to swear (just squeak). Sure, he could have been weaving along the road, flashing his headlight and sounding his horn, but who wants to do that all the time? His 4 daughters really need a functioning father, so he chose to retire from active riding.
    I see quite a few bikers around Sheffield all in black and on black bikes. Often sporting that cafe racer look. It's a strong look, and from someone who doesn't take much notice of trends I don't get it. But fack me, make your own luck!

    I appreciate non of that applies to your mate, but I can't believe how many take to fashion and not keeping your form.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stace View Post
    I see quite a few bikers around Sheffield all in black and on black bikes. Often sporting that cafe racer look. It's a strong look, and from someone who doesn't take much notice of trends I don't get it. But fack me, make your own luck!
    I bet their bikes are louder than your car. Black clothing on motorbikes goes back about as far as motorbikes themselves, and tbh nobody's gonna clock the colour of your fuel tank as a safety beacon when you're astride the thing.
    When I lived in London I used to wonder what sort of obnoxious c*nt would ride a noisy KTM dirt bike on street tyres as a daily, every time one tore past my place at 6am. I now realise it the sort of c*nt that wants you to hear them coming.
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    I get that bit, but you'd put your front light on, no?
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    Quote Originally Posted by N/B View Post
    I bet their bikes are louder than your car. Black clothing on motorbikes goes back about as far as motorbikes themselves, and tbh nobody's gonna clock the colour of your fuel tank as a safety beacon when you're astride the thing.
    When I lived in London I used to wonder what sort of obnoxious c*nt would ride a noisy KTM dirt bike on street tyres as a daily, every time one tore past my place at 6am. I now realise it the sort of c*nt that wants you to hear them coming.
    Iím not sure it works. I think pedestrians hear it, but the trouble with exhausts is that they fire backwards, along with all their noise and the car ahead isnít really getting the noise barrage, especially with windows closed, AC on, stereo up.

    For me, it is a false assumption that many riders make. Furthermore, we just alienate ourselves further from the good folks that weíd like not to kill us. I made that assumption too - I had a bastard loud exhaust at one stage in the name of safety (in part), but I donít think it helps much. And even then I had a iPodíd pedestrian just walk out into the road in front of me. The got clipped for their troubles.

    Iím happy with the aftermarket, fruitier exhaust on my bike. Looks nice, sounds nice, not too rude. Doesnít help safety.

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    A bit late to this one Findlay.
    I'm on my 6th GS, Got my first in 2001, an 1150, then an 1150 Adv (All pre Long Way Round he says smugly)
    Recently traded my 1200 GSA in for a new Africa Twin. (Way better IMHO and despite the numbers on paper saying different, it feels so much lighter and nimble than the GS)
    The GS is a hugely competent bike but has become so common..oops, popular, every 2nd bike is a GS..BMW have been quick to cotton on to the new biker trends...or rather to set them. Most bikers are in the 45-60yr bracket. Very few kids ride bikes now. The demographic has spare cash and thinks nowt of spunking £18k on an all singing all dancing GS. Bloody madness...

    Anyway, I'd just spend £1k on something like a CB500 or Kawasaki Versys. As you've not passed your test, rent the bike from the school you do the test with and see how you like it before chucking money at buying one yourself. It may not be for you.
    Kit wise, you don't have to spend a fortune,. New helmet with the important bit being that it fits correctly. A £80 helmet that fits right will be far better for you than a £500 race rep that flaps about or is so tight it gives you a headache. Clothing can be bought 2nd hand off various forums etc...and your size is often lucky at getting real bargains at the bike shows.


    A biggish bike will cost as much to run as a car. Tyres in 3-6k miles and £200 a pair. It seems rude to mention economy in biker circles cos, well, they're rufty tufty bikers, but owt between 35 to 85mpg depending on the bike and how you ride.

    I'm a life long biker and only death (or arthritus) will see me quit but I'd think long and hard about it if I were you. Where you live may see you get 4-6 mths riding a year? a 20 minute commute may be quicker on a bike but not when you factor in getting kitted up, wheeling it out of the garage etc.
    If a man speaks his mind in a forest and no woman hears him...is he still wrong ?

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    Regular Neil Mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave B View Post
    (All pre Long Way Round he says smugly)
    You'd get on well with my colleague Bob. He and a mate decided to ride their bikes from Buckinghamshire to Cape Town over 30 years ago (when Ewan McGregor was eating Coco Pops and watching Scooby Doo after school), skirting round war zones and generally having a ridiculously good time. I'm trying to bully him into attending an MM event, as I think he'd do really well...
    "Fortunately, I'd taken a spare Gearbox, Turbo, Actuator, Banjo Connector, Steering Rack, Driveshafts, ECU, Wideband sensor, 57-51mm silicone reducing elbow and a Copper Banjo Washer." - Nige

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    I love chatting to these people, the ones who just went and did it, no big corporations to get them out of the mire, no 'fixers'

    It's said that KTM turned down Charlie and Ewan and were forever annoyed at the lost opportunity, in reality the pair demanded big chunks of cash as well as free bikes and kit. KTM told them to swivel.
    If a man speaks his mind in a forest and no woman hears him...is he still wrong ?

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    No worriesch, dey will be conscholing demschelfs wid a schmoke and a pancake!
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by N/B View Post
    No worriesch, dey will be conscholing demschelfs wid a schmoke and a pancake!
    I suppose they could, if they travelled from Austria to the Netherlands...
    "Fortunately, I'd taken a spare Gearbox, Turbo, Actuator, Banjo Connector, Steering Rack, Driveshafts, ECU, Wideband sensor, 57-51mm silicone reducing elbow and a Copper Banjo Washer." - Nige

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    Turn up to any ACU licensed event & KTM is the weapon of choice. It literally is a sea of orange.





    Needless to say I use a Husqvarna

  26. #26
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    If new to biking, don't go big budget to buy your ultimate dream bike. Buy something cheaper and lower powered to run for a year or so and then upgrade once you've got some experience.
    In mine (and all my biking friends experience) 2 things are likely to happen:
    1. You will fall off / drop the bike at some point, (of the 4 bikes I've owned, all of them have been on their side at some point: Bandit 400; over confident overtake followed by target fixation and I ran in to a kerb... genuinely thought I was about to die by clearing the barrier and falling off a 'flyover'... obviously I didn't, was able to pick the bike up, dust myself down and ride home,
    ZX6R, and Fazer 600 [only 2 months ago] both dropped whilst stationary... thinking the stand was down but it wasn't!
    ZX9R stopped close to the kerb and got my foot caught between it and the bike while dismounting)
    2. Read up on Target Fixation. Consciously train yourself not to let it happen. (Look where you want to ride, not at the gravel/ tree/ car that you are trying to avoid).

    Do buy decent riding gear, and always use it!

    I inherited my Fazer 600 from my dad when he got Parkinson's and dementia. I'd never have bought one because Sports Bikes are awesome... however it's perfect for my commute during summer... plenty fast enough and I can frequently use 100% of the performance it offers.
    In contrast my ZX9R was frustrating because to use it in the same way meant crazy fast speeds (it only felt fast once doing 120 mph plus. I got rid of it after knackering the gearbox by doing too many wheelies in an attempt to have fun at more sensible speeds).
    Last edited by snooky; 22-08-2018 at 10:23 PM.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Mac View Post
    I suppose they could, if they travelled from Austria to the Netherlands...
    Ah, my mishtake, I short dey were toadally Dutch!
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    lots to say.

    I am not going to make many friends with that statement, but as a motorcyclist who will admit to doing well over three figures in several sections of my daily 20 mile commute between Napton and Coventry...

    -I have seldom been surprised/caught out by a car. 99% of the times when underwear required a change, the fault was traceable to a mistake of mine, normally a lack of attention/observation/brain cells.

    -I cant stand bikers, even less so when they think their machines defines them. Morons on shiny cruisers, wankers on adventure bikes that barely ever go anywhere, twats on sportsbikes that group together to crash faster than they would by themselves...

    I rode a 400cc to brittany for a holiday, commuted on bikes in the english countryside, in Amsterdam, round brittany and I still use my current triumph in Paris.


    there is nothing wrong with japanese IL4's. if anything, they tend to do everything so well, I think of them as great learner bikes. They accelerate stop and turn better than anything in the same price bracket. Low weight and centre of gravity are kind to the learning/forgetful rider.

    -get a donor card. I never ride without mine. its a very useful reminder to self of where you stand in the food chain.

    -if you take to it, staying alive becomes a beautiful science. You will find yourself scanning the hedges obscuring along the road for clues of vehicles, perhaps the smoke of a tractor's stack about to leave the field. I occasionally manage "mirror eye contact" with drivers.

    a few weeks back whilst going to visit a client on the wrong side of Paris, I was following a local filtering through traffic. I remember considering the fact that our speed in relation to the traffic slowing down was starting to get a little bit much by my standard. We were doing 50/60, the cars were slowing down to about 20/30. >I would not have done it by myself, but Pšrisian bikers have a different filter to what we consider acceptable in the UK, and I started to reason the danger factor against slowing down and then having to contend with other bikers catching me up and passing me.
    I didnt get to further into this line of thinking as the bloke I was following was taken clean out by a foreign van that decided to change lanes suddenly.

    Last edited by djuwenda; 23-08-2018 at 08:04 AM.
    to the hedge, and beyond.

    R1 4XV, XF 3.0D

  29. #29
    Regular leavingeasy's Avatar
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    ^^^ ^^^^

    Excellent response

    Iím a life long biker and this sums it up perfectly.

    Also Parisian bikers are the maddest commuters Iíve ever seen!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by leavingeasy View Post
    ^^^ ^^^^

    Also Parisian bikers are the maddest commuters Iíve ever seen!
    They're a joy to watch.


    lots to say.

    I am not going to make many friends with that statement, but as a motorcyclist who will admit to doing well over three figures in several sections of my daily 20 mile commute between Napton and Coventry...

    -I have seldom been surprised/caught out by a car. 99% of the times when underwear required a change, the fault was traceable to a mistake of mine, normally a lack of attention/observation/brain cells.

    -I cant stand bikers, even less so when they think their machines defines them. Morons on shiny cruisers, wankers on adventure bikes that barely ever go anywhere, twats on sportsbikes that group together to crash faster than they would by themselves...

    I rode a 400cc to brittany for a holiday, commuted on bikes in the english countryside, in Amsterdam, round brittany and I still use my current triumph in Paris.


    there is nothing wrong with japanese IL4's. if anything, they tend to do everything so well, I think of them as great learner bikes. They accelerate stop and turn better than anything in the same price bracket. Low weight and centre of gravity are kind to the learning/forgetful rider.

    -get a donor card. I never ride without mine. its a very useful reminder to self of where you stand in the food chain.

    -if you take to it, staying alive becomes a beautiful science. You will find yourself scanning the hedges obscuring along the road for clues of vehicles, perhaps the smoke of a tractor's stack about to leave the field. I occasionally manage "mirror eye contact" with drivers.
    Great reply
    If a man speaks his mind in a forest and no woman hears him...is he still wrong ?

  31. #31
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    I cant stand bikers, even less so when they think their machines defines them. Morons on shiny cruisers, wankers on adventure bikes that barely ever go anywhere

    We'll let this fella off...

    https://vimeo.com/43297360
    If a man speaks his mind in a forest and no woman hears him...is he still wrong ?

  32. #32
    Regular snooky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djuwenda View Post

    -I have seldom been surprised/caught out by a car. 99% of the times when underwear required a change, the fault was traceable to a mistake of mine, normally a lack of attention/observation/brain cells.

    -if you take to it, staying alive becomes a beautiful science. You will find yourself scanning the hedges obscuring along the road for clues of vehicles, perhaps the smoke of a tractor's stack about to leave the field. I occasionally manage "eye contact" with drivers
    These two bits above particularly resonate with me.
    I'm sure it's safer to be the fastest thing on the road than sit in traffic with muggles. I'm always alert. I expect people not to see me coming... especially at roundabouts, so leave a margin for people pulling out on me. When they do, I'm not wound up by it.
    I commute in the car in winter because it's dark and hard to see bikes, the road can be sloppy, plus being really cold is no fun and leads to mistakes.
    MX5 - Track Car (Vino)
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
    I expect people not to see me coming... especially at roundabouts, so leave a margin for people pulling out on me. When they do, I'm not wound up by it.
    Spot on.
    If a man speaks his mind in a forest and no woman hears him...is he still wrong ?

  34. #34
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    I suggest a VFR750. Stable, easy to ride in traffic, only fast if you want to ride fast, Honda quality
    Chris
    The older you get, the faster you used to be.....

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Stace View Post
    I get that bit, but you'd put your front light on, no?
    Since 2002 not possible to turn them off on bikes

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